The habitable planet, Disc 3 : Programs 9-11 [videorecording]

by Lewicke, Anna.; Finkelstein, Nancy.; Griswold, Alex.; Schneps, Matthew H.; Cane, Mark.. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Science Media Group.; Harvard University. Center for the Environment.; Annenberg Media..
Type: Visual Material
Series: The habitable planet : a systems approach to environmental science .Publisher: [S. Burlington, Vt. : Annenberg Media], c2007 .Description: 1 videodisc (90 min.) sd. , col. ; 4 3/4 in .Summary: Course: Explores the natural functions of Earth's systems: geophysical, atmospheric, oceanic, and ecosystems; Earth's ability to sustain life, especially human life; and the effects that human actions have had on the different natural systems. Components include 13 half-hour video programs featuring two documentary case studies describing current environmental science research, and an extensive Web site providing content, activities, and resources to help educators deepen and extend their understanding of environmental science ; Program 9, Biodiversity decline: Living species on Earth may number anywhere from 5 million to 50 million or more. Although we have yet to identify and describe most of these life forms, we know that many are endangered today by development, pollution, over-harvesting, and other threats. Earth has experienced mass extinctions in the past due to natural causes, but the factors reducing biodiversity today increasingly stem from human activities. In this unit we see how scientists measure biodiversity, how it benefits our species, and what trends might cause Earth's next mass extinction ; Program 10, Energy challenges: Industrialized nations rely on vast quantities of readily available energy to power their economies and produce goods and services. As populations increase in developing countries and citizens demand better standards of living, global energy consumption will continue to rise, along with demands for non-fuel mineral resources such as iron and steel. Learn about new technologies that can produce ample supplies of energy without some of the environmental costs linked to current energy resources ; Program 11, Atmospheric pollution: Many forms of atmospheric pollution affect human health and the environment at levels from local to global. These contaminants are emitted from diverse sources, and some of them react together to form new compounds in the air. Industrialized nations have made important progress toward controlling some pollutants in recent decades, but air quality is much worse in many developing countries, and global circulation patterns can transport some types of pollution rapidly around the world. In this unit, discover the basic chemistry of atmospheric pollution and learn which human activities have the greatest impacts on air quality .ISBN: 1576808831.Other Title: A systems approach to environmental science .Related Subjects: Earth -- Environmental aspects | Environmental sciences | Human beings -- Effect of environment on | Nature -- Effect of human beings on | Ecology | Human ecology | Biosphere | Biodiversity | Biotic communities | Endangered ecosystems | Endangered species | Extinction (Biology) | Power resources | Energy consumption | Renewable energy sources | Fossil fuels | Air -- Pollution | Climatic changes | Global temperature changes Online Resources: Contents: Disc 3. Program 9. Biodiversity decline (30 min.) -- Program 10. Energy challenges (30 min.) -- Program 11. Atmospheric pollution (30 min.)
Item type Library Shelving Location Collection Call Number Status Date Due
Media, 7 Days Main Library Ask at Circulation Desk MEDIA - Includes videos, CDs, CD-ROMs and kits. QB 631 .H33 2007 DVD # 9-11 (Browse Shelf) Available

Disc 3. Program 9. Biodiversity decline (30 min.) -- Program 10. Energy challenges (30 min.) -- Program 11. Atmospheric pollution (30 min.)

Project manager: Nancy Finkelstein ; executive producer: Alex Griswold ; executive director: Dr. Matthew H. Schneps ; featured scientists: Mark Cane ... [et al.].

Narration: Anna Lewicke.

Course: Explores the natural functions of Earth's systems: geophysical, atmospheric, oceanic, and ecosystems; Earth's ability to sustain life, especially human life; and the effects that human actions have had on the different natural systems. Components include 13 half-hour video programs featuring two documentary case studies describing current environmental science research, and an extensive Web site providing content, activities, and resources to help educators deepen and extend their understanding of environmental science.

Program 9, Biodiversity decline: Living species on Earth may number anywhere from 5 million to 50 million or more. Although we have yet to identify and describe most of these life forms, we know that many are endangered today by development, pollution, over-harvesting, and other threats. Earth has experienced mass extinctions in the past due to natural causes, but the factors reducing biodiversity today increasingly stem from human activities. In this unit we see how scientists measure biodiversity, how it benefits our species, and what trends might cause Earth's next mass extinction.

Program 10, Energy challenges: Industrialized nations rely on vast quantities of readily available energy to power their economies and produce goods and services. As populations increase in developing countries and citizens demand better standards of living, global energy consumption will continue to rise, along with demands for non-fuel mineral resources such as iron and steel. Learn about new technologies that can produce ample supplies of energy without some of the environmental costs linked to current energy resources.

Program 11, Atmospheric pollution: Many forms of atmospheric pollution affect human health and the environment at levels from local to global. These contaminants are emitted from diverse sources, and some of them react together to form new compounds in the air. Industrialized nations have made important progress toward controlling some pollutants in recent decades, but air quality is much worse in many developing countries, and global circulation patterns can transport some types of pollution rapidly around the world. In this unit, discover the basic chemistry of atmospheric pollution and learn which human activities have the greatest impacts on air quality.

Funding for this program provided by Annenberg Media.


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